The unseen risks of releasing an app in the app stores

After I’ve spent pretty much all of 2018 building android apps for the app stores, I’ve come to the conclusion that I’l shift away from this now in 2019 and concentrate more on websites like this one as I’ve came across some hidden risks that I didn’t learn beforehand. 

So I kind of learned the hard way here and I will share my experiences that I’ve had wile trying to make it into the app developer world.

If you’ve ever had the experience of releasing apps before then you will most definitely have had this happen to you and if not then it will probably only be a matter of time before it does, or if you’re thinking of releasing an app then you will soon learn how painful it can be to experience the problems that come with it.

Because so many apps exist today then I guess the big app stores can afford to be picky about what they let in. 

Unfortunately this comes at a cost. That cost is you, the developer. 

Google Play is THE biggest android app store on the internet and if you have a rejected app from Google then there are other app stores out there such as Amazon, but these app stores are in no competition with the Play store. 

There’s not much you can do except publish your apps on these alternative platforms or be stuck with an app you probably spent weeks or even months building and no where to offer it to the public in a place that’s easily found such as Google Play.

Risk vs reward

I guess it’s true what they say.. The more risk you take, the greater the reward you will receive. 

This is certainly the case with app development. Everyone has a great app idea. 

But unless you implement it and give it a really good execution (by that I mean you have a landing page website, you have the Android and IOS version and you spend some money on advertising) then it is just that. An idea. Ideas themselves are not worth much in today’s world. 

Many developer companies spend years building apps before just one of them takes off and the developers eventually start earning some income.

For me then, I had around a total of fifteen apps at the end of my first year and one of those apps eventually started getting some really good feedback and the number of installs were getting into the thousands. 

It’s a great feeling when this happens and you start calculating how many installs you will need to make x amount of income per month. So at around 2,500 installs I was making almost £100 per month. 

If I could get that to ten times the amount and make £1,000 per month I could become financially free! This is certainly  a good incentive and this was my goal. 

But just when things seem to be going right, The app stores will kick you right back down.

My advice here would certainly not build an app using any SMS permissions as Google Play see’s this as a high risk to them, and I’ve been battling with Google for months now to keep my app live, but it doesn’t look good for me now. 

My focus now when I make apps in the future is to use as little permissions as possible. 

This is really frustrating because I have some really good innovative ideas that could very well change the world, but my experience here has proven that if I want to publish apps then I have to abide by the rules and restrictions that Google Play has set out for you. 

Google is by far the most strict android app store I have used, although I have had problems with Amazon in the past. 

With Amazon I needed written permission from the copyright holder to use the android logo in my app store presence. 

This to me just seems crazy as android is an open source platform. I feel that your always in some corporations pocket and you play by their rules. 

Me? I play by my own rules. 

And hopefully you do to. Don’t allow silicon Valley to take away your ideas, expressions and income.

App stores vs private hosting

So after the big app stores reject you app then what do you do? I decided that if I have an app that was creating some significant revenue then this just cannot be ignored. 

I started building landing page websites for the app and host my app on my website. This to me seems to be the safest way in keeping your app live. 

However, If you are incorporating adverts into your app then you will need to find an advertising platform that will be happy to serve you ads. 

Google’s Admob will most likely not allow this. As I say, It’s so very strict and so frustrating when not only your app is removed from the app store but the advertising company then stops serving your apps ads.

A landing page website may not be as good as having your app published into Google Play, but I guess it’s the next best thing. 

It still feels like a big hit to you and certainly to your bank account.

Getting a suspension and app removal

When I first began to hear of people getting suspensions from a top app store such as Google Play, I would immediately assume that the app must have done something real bad for this to happen. 

However, this is not always the case, and your app can be suspended for even the slightest details.

Sometime’s this isn’t much of an issue if you can fix the problem relatively easy and roll out an update. 

But it is very possible that you can do nothing about the situation and therefore you have to sit and watch your app die in front of your very own eyes. 

This is not a pleasant experience at all when you’ve just put your heart and soul into your project.

 

Google Play removing an app

Rethinking the approach

I certainly wont be spending as much time building apps now as when I was during 2018 although I do have some projects that need completing. 

After I complete these apps then I will concentrate mainly on my own websites where I’m free to express my own ideas. 

Right now I’m focused on this site and I am quite excited to get this going strong and hopefully make something cool for you guys.

 But as with technology, we all know that anything can change at any time!

This post wasn’t meant to deter anyone from creating apps in the future, but just to warn you of these hidden risks that don’t seem to be obvious. 

Well at least not for me anyway. If you do plan on creating apps then I wish you the very best of luck.. and don’t forget to create something awesome 🙂

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